Our Pulse Beats Blue

“M.E.G. is truly an amazing organization. When my husband was told right before Christmas that he was going to be terminated at the end of the month. M.E.G. stepped up and made sure that we’d be able to have a true Christmas for our children. We are truly thankful for all the support Meg and her team provided for us.” – Ines Delgado, wife of Omar​

December 2017

M.E.G. and company have adopted Officer Omar Delgado’s family for Christmas. We will be a JOTT on December 17 accepting donations so that we can make this holiday sparkle for his family. On December 18 we will travel down to Florida to deliver the presents and donations to Omar and his family. If you would like to contribute prior to December 17, please contact Meg at [email protected]

On December 5, Crystal Hayes with USA TODAY reported on Officer Omar Delgado’s Story:

“An officer hailed as a hero for his actions during the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando is being let go just six months before he would have become vested in his pension.

Omar Delgado, 45, a corporal at the Eatonville Police Department, was one of the first officers at the club in the early hours of June 12, 2016, after a gunman killed 49 people and injured dozens in what then the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. 

Delgado, who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of witnessing the carnage, scoured through bodies that littered the ground and helped survivors get to safety. One of the clubgoers he helped was Angel Colon, who was shot six times.

An extra six months on the job would have allowed Delgado to receive 64% of his salary with benefits for life, the Orlando Sentinel reported. Since he will leave the force before making it to 10 years, he will receive 42% of his earnings, the paper noted.

Delgado, who has mainly worked on desk duty since the attack, said the department told him they needed to replace him because of his PTSD and because they need an additional officer on patrol, a job he can no longer perform. He said he’s ready to leave and focus on his mental health but asked his superiors to wait an additional six months so he can mark 10 years at the department and become vested in his pension.”